• njrusmc

    External power to active pickups

    Gents,

    I have read about the X-bat external battery system but I had a simpler and cheaper alternative. Just buy an 18V power supply rated for at least 200 microamps, cut off the end and replace it with a 9V battery connector and snap that onto your pickups. Run the wire alongside your sound cable (secured with shrink wrap or tie-wraps) down to your amp where your power outlet will be.

    Has anyone ever tried something like this? It seems extraneous, but efficient.

    On another note: Has anyone ever directly compared EMG HZ H-4's (MH 250 NT) to EMG 81/85's (MH 400 NT). I just bought a 400 and I want to buy a 250 soon also (I am about to sell my old 100) and I was just wondering if anyone can tell me if those passives are jammin (for passive pickups, at least).

    -NR

    • ozzuk1

      I found the H4's ok not the best pickups certainly better than most stock low end pickups...

      They should be fine with a bit of tweaking, I think the H4/H4A is pretty good combo...

      You may wan't to stick emg's in there eventually though....

      • njrusmc

        That is why I bought the 400, because it has actives. I still wanted a guitar with passives for general purpose practicing. Likewise, most people say its wise to change batteries with every string change ... I don't know how inclined I am to spend another 10$ on that as well.

        I am also a firm believer that every good guitarist should have a backup guitar that intentionally doesn't sound as good as their primary guitar. This way, after you practice on the backup, you fully appreciate the primary one and its sound is noticeably better. Thats just me, though.

        Thanks for the feedback. My MH100 had stock LTD-150's that are not very good. Plus the Floyd Rose is a pain and the tuning goes out of whack constantly.

    • andrei

      i don't think it's worth the extra work and the inconvenience of being also tied up to the power suply.

      the batteries realy do last for a long time.

      don't go for passives just 'cose they don't require batteries.
      give the h4's a chance, keep them if you like them / change them if you don't.

      the 400 is overall superior, anyone whoud say to save money and get that one.
      i'll say: get the best model you can afford.
      (fuck the theory about the backup guitar that "is supposed" to sound worse; a good instruments will help you evolve but also show your mistakes and you WILL appreciate it regardless)

    • njrusmc

      I guess I should mention that the "back-up" guitar is also useful for your friend that comes over and sucks, you don't want him hammering your $1000 guitar, so you hand him your 50 or 100 series LTD :)

      • andrei

        I guess I should mention that the "back-up" guitar is also useful for your friend that comes over and sucks, you don't want him hammering your $1000 guitar, so you hand him your 50 or 100 series LTD :)

        if u're at the point of buying guitars for your mates to gig on, then you've spent enough $$ on your own gear.
        i get what you mean, but it doesn't make sense to me.
        if he sucks, don't let him play it. f-simple.

        whotf buys guitars for me to play... ?!
        i need new buddies...

    • riku

      you could always run the power backwards up your guitar cable in the same way that phantom power runs backwards up a mic cable. But given how long batteries last then isn't really worth the effort.
      What you could do with phantom power is make it switch a switch inside your guitar which changes your pickup selection. Make the phantom power footswitchable and you've got your pickup selector on footswitchs, leaving your hands free.

      • indytruckboy

        I gig about once a week. Practice with the same guitar I use llive 2 times a week. Battery usually ends up getting changed every 6 months to 8 months. Not cause it's dead, because it's been a long time and I need one less worry.

        Every string change is retarded. EMG says the battery should last like 1000 hours. So if you played NON-STOP for 24 hours a day. It would take 41 days of playing to kill the battery.:rollin:eek::lol

      • chevy Z 302

        you could always run the power backwards up your guitar cable in the same way that phantom power runs backwards up a mic cable. But given how long batteries last then isn't really worth the effort.
        What you could do with phantom power is make it switch a switch inside your guitar which changes your pickup selection. Make the phantom power footswitchable and you've got your pickup selector on footswitchs, leaving your hands free.

        how do you plan on running phantom power via an instrument cable? :\

    • njrusmc

      True. I just sold my MH 100 today, getting an H207 (which is by no means awesome) with Stewmac pots and a JB in the bridge, so that should sound halfway decent for the $255 I spent on it.


    Cancel